The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

Background

Widely-recognized nationally and internationally for its iconic Doomsday Clock, its flagship Journal, and its rigorous research on nuclear weapons and energy, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists has been expanding into other areas of vital interest and risk to humankind – climate change and emerging technology. Yet awareness of the Bulletin’s impact beyond the Clock and nuclear reporting was limited, while competition in a frenzied media market was intensifying. Under a new CEO and a reinvigorated board, the Bulletin sought to clarify brand and messaging, determine the Bulletin’s place in the new media landscape, develop and implement a marketing and communications plan to expand partnerships and distribution channels, and raise awareness of its fact-based, expert-driven journalism.

Our Work

We carried out a series of fact-finding activities to gain insight into legacy, current positioning and recognition, and future challenges and opportunities for the Bulletin. We scanned competitive media, carried out a series of interviews with the Bulletin’s editorial team, board members and funders, along with senior editorial, advertising, and event executives from leading global media. Our purpose was to establish a baseline: how is the Bulletin currently perceived, what do we know about its audience, what additional information would be useful to obtain, and, most importantly, how can the Bulletin extend its brand recognition and expand content reach and impact? We created a multi-platform plan that embraced opportunities to more fully engage audiences and raise general awareness through expanded content distribution and social media presence, event planning, public relations, and broader exposure of the Bulletin’s executive and editorial leadership.

Impact

The Bulletin is an influential media organization more deeply engaging audiences around the world across all platforms. Its content, including interviews with – and stories by – global leaders in nuclear, climate, and technology risk, is a must-read for policymakers. While its Doomsday Clock is a signature icon, the Bulletin now is more widely understood and valued not just as a beacon warning about nuclear threats, but also as a forum for solutions to “reduce man-made threats to our existence.”